Saturday, October 8, 2011

The Skilled Housewife

Young Woman Arranging Flowers in Living Room





Keeping house is more than just doing dishes, or ironing clothes. It is more than fixing supper or washing floors. Being a housewife is a skilled profession. In the old days, girls took home economics courses in school. Some even went to college to study the science of homemaking.  It is a beautiful thing to see a lovely, cared for home, even if there are humble surroundings.

Housewives need to learn the art of cooking, baking, sewing, mending, decorating, cleaning, thrift and so much more. They need to take pride in their work, putting forth their best effort.

The other night I was washing the dishes, while listening to  Crooners  on the radio.  I thought of how there are so many people who hate their jobs, and I was thankful that I loved mine. I love being here. I am grateful for the training I've had, and the experience I have in homemaking. I delight in setting an atmosphere of "home" for all who enter.

I took 3 years of home economics in school. I also studied for four years as a secretary, which taught me how to be a helper and assistant to my husband. It also taught me how to manage books and keep things organized and efficient.  I worked as a maid and spent much of my time taking care of children. All this happened before I turned 18 years old. I was taught how to keep house. I was trained in the art of homemaking and motherhood. For this I am eternally grateful.

Blessings
Mrs. White




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5 comments:

Bobbi Jo said...

I am with you on this. I am so thankful to know how to be a good homemaker and for loving what I get to do on a daily basis. Thank you for sharing, Bobbi Jo

Linda said...

I didn't get much training before I was married but with the help of a few godly women, especially my sweet and very talented (in the art of home-making and more) mother-in-law, I have learned a lot. I love being home to care for my family.
Thank-you Mrs.White for the encouragement you give home-makers.

Michelle said...

Sharon,

With all that wonderful and professional training, have you ever considered writing an e-book?

I would buy it:)

Anonymous said...

Before I sat down at the computer, I was blinking back tears at the chaos in our home. My husband works 55-70 hours per week and this week will be pushing 80 hours, we homeschool our 5 children in a modestly sized home with minimal storage and no bookshelves(!).

We are almost out of food (even the flour, oil and salt are used up) and I was standing in my messy kitchen wondering how on earth I was going to feed my family for the next 4 days until payday and overwhelmed by the clutter on top of my recently sparkling floors and counters.

Your blog is like honey to my soul. It is so encouraging to have homemaking advice that doesn't suggest what you must purchase before your house can be in order. I also love that you promote homemaking as a profession, because right now, I want to curl up and cry. The past few months have been the first time in my life when I have had to fear the very real possiblity of not having any food for my children. Like you, a cup of tea easily satisfies me, but not my little ones. Thank you for so openly sharing how you have dealt with financial difficulties, I feel less alone and so encouraged.

Forgive my ramblings, I just wanted you to know how your writings have blessed and encouraged me to serve the Lord by cheerfully and dilligently serving my family.

Mrs. T

Sue said...

To anonymous: Seek out a church as soon as you can and they will assist you in some way with your need for food. Don't let pride stand in the way. We have ALL been there at one time or another. If you also can, visit a food pantry. With the economy the way it is people who would never have stepped foot in one have to now just for some help. Please don't let pride stand in the way.

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